Top Menu

Morikami Hems In Tokyo Fashion Exhibit This Fall

Harajuku, an area between Shinjuku and Shibuya in Tokyo, has risen to the highest ranks of Japanese fashion. In the late 50s and early 60s the neighborhood was transformed from U.S. soldiers’ housing into a well-spring of youth culture (similar to the likes of Haight Ashbury in 1960’s San Francisco) that solidified into what many call the Harajuku-zoku, or the Harajuku tribe. The neighborhood was overtaken by photographers, models, artists, fashion designers and local youth, and has become the ultimate youth stomping ground.

Some of the most visible and popular movements to come out of Harajuku are Japan’s many street fashions. From Decora to Rock-a-billy, and everything in between, this style-hub has a place for every expression of style.

If you were one of the many Morikami fans to participate in our Hatsume 2013 Costume or Fashion Show Contests, you might have already seen our Street Fashion Facebook Album, but it’s a great visual introduction to some of these popular Japanese street styles:

Decora is characterized by an abundance of accessories.

Decora is characterized by an abundance of accessories on casual clothing. Color is also important, and you’ll see neons as well as pastels.

Lolita style is remniscent of Victorian Dolls, and uses this particular dress sihlouette for a number of "Loli" styles like Sweet Loli, Punk Loli, and Gothic Loli.

Lolita style is reminiscent of Victorian Dolls, and uses this particular dress silhouette for a number of “Loli” styles like Sweet Loli, Punk Loli, and Gothic Loli.

Visual Kei is based on the Glam Rock movement, and employs elements of androgyny.

Visual Kei is based on the Glam Rock movement, and employs elements of androgyny for both males and females.

Kodona is based on the same era as Lolita style except that it focuses on boys' wear. Kodona can be understood as boy style and is worn by both males and females.

Kodona is based on the same era as Lolita style except that it focuses on boys’ wear. Kodona can be understood as boy style and is worn by both males and females.

We’re excited to share that this autumn we’ll be showcasing these expressive styles in a photography exhibit titled “Contemporary Japanese Street Fashion.” If you’ve had the pleasure of snapping shots of the rock-a-billy clubs in Yoyogi Park, or Harajuku girls in Tokyo, we’re asking for submissions to feature in the exhibit. The deadline to submit photos is July 15th, and we’ll be choosing finalists shortly thereafter. Check our website for full submission details.

If you’re not photographically-inclined, but still want to enjoy the outrageous and beautiful fashions of Harajuku, you might be interested in attending the lecture by Professor Yuniya Kawamura of the Fashion Institute of Technology, in NYC. Professor Kawamura will join us Friday, November 1, at 7:15pm for a 45-minute talk on the art of Japanese street fashion, its many subcultures, and its influence in Japanese society and in the West.

Stay tuned for more details on the exhibit and lecture as the fall draws near!

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Navigation