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Seasons Archives: 2017-2018

A Summer of Studio Ghibli Films: The Classics

Sponsored by JM Family Enterprises

The critically acclaimed works of Studio Ghibli has won numerous awards and recognition all over the world. This summer at the Morikami, journey into the fantastic and imaginative world of six Studio Ghibli classics with stories that touch the heart, inspire, and make us smile.

Cost: $5 (with paid museum admission) (children ages 3 and under free)
Special Summer Pass: $20 for 6 films of your choice
Location: Morikami Theater

Buy Individual Tickets $5 each$20 Summer Pass


FEATURED FILMS

© 2008 Studio Ghibli – NDHDMT

Ponyo – A film by Hayao Miyazaki
(101 min., Rated G)

Saturday, May 5, 2018 (11:00am & 2:00pm)
(Dubbed in English)

Perfect for audiences of all ages, Ponyo centers on the friendship between five-year-old Sosuke and a magical goldfish named Ponyo, the young daughter of a sorcerer father and a sea-goddess mother. After a chance encounter, Ponyo yearns to become a human so she can be with Sosuke. As to be expected with Miyazaki, the film is awash in pure unbridled imagination and visual wonder — but it is the tender love, humor, and devotion exhibited by Ponyo and Sosuke that form the emotional heart of the film. 

 


© 1988 Studio Ghibli

My Neighbor Totoro – A film by Hayao Miyazaki
(86 min., Rated G)

Wednesday, June 13, 2018 (11:00 am)
(In Japanese, subtitled in English)

Saturday, June 16, 2018 (2:00pm)
(Dubbed in English)

One of the most endearing and internationally renowned films of all time, a film that Roger Ebert called “one of the five best movies” ever made for children, My Neighbor Totoro is a deceptively simple tale of two girls, Satsuki and Mei, who move with their father to a new house in the countryside. They soon discover that the surrounding forests are home to a family of Totoros, gentle but powerful creatures who live in a huge and ancient camphor tree and are seen only by children. Based on Miyazaki’s own childhood imaginings, Totoros look like oversized pandas with bunny ears and they take the girls on spinning-top rides through the tree tops and introduce them to a furry, multi-pawed Catbus — a nod to Lewis Carroll’s Cheshire Cat.

But beneath the film’s playfulness and narrative simplicity lie depths of wisdom. As with much of Miyazaki’s work, at its core My Neighbor Totoro is about human-kind’s relationship to the Earth. The film is infused with an almost spiritual reverence for the power of nature (a philosophy tied to the ancient Shinto belief that every object in nature has a soul). Everything that surrounds us, from light-dappled tree groves, to the marvelous clouds, echoes the density and lusciousness of life. Protected by the Totoros, we know no harm will come to our two heroines in the forest’s sunlit glades and mysterious shadows. The girls may be awed by the power and majesty around them but they understand instinctively that nature has no malice. The viewer is left with a sense of wonder at the beauty, mystery and preciousness of the world all around us.


© 1984 Studio Ghibli – H

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind – A film by Hayao Miyazaki
(116 min., Rated PG)

Wednesday, June 13, 2018 (2;00pm)
(In Japanese, subtitled in English)

Saturday, June 16, 2018 (11:00am)
(Dubbed in English)

The debut film from Hayao Miyazaki, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind is considered by many to be his masterwork — and there are few films, animated or otherwise, of such sweeping scope and grandeur. Set in a devastated future world decimated by atmospheric poisons and swarming with gigantic insects, Nausicaä is the story of a young princess, both brave and innocent, whose love for all living things and passionate determination to understand the processes of nature lead her into terrible danger, sacrifice, and eventual triumph.Like most Studio Ghibli films, there is neither good nor evil, but conflicting viewpoints, weaknesses, and power struggles. Throughout the film, Miyazaki’s animation is awe-inspiring; the depiction of the poisoned forest in particular is a thing of transcendent beauty. Once the hallucinogenic strangeness of shape and color has been accepted, there is light, growth and life everywhere. Huge dragonfly-like creatures are accompanied by wonderful, evocative sounds of flight and movement. The lethal fungus plants glow, shimmer and shed spores like silent gleaming snowfalls. This is a film not to be missed.


© 1989 Eiko Kadono – Studio Ghibli – N

Kiki’s Delivery Service – A Film by Hayao Miyazaki
(102 min., Rated G)

Wednesday, July 18, 2018 (11:00am)
(In Japanese, subtitled in English)

Saturday, July 21, 2018 (2:00pm)
(Dubbed in English)

From the legendary Hayao Miyazaki comes the beloved story of a resourceful young witch who uses her broom to create a delivery service, only to lose her gift of flight in a moment of self-doubt. It is tradition for all young witches to leave their families on the night of a full moon and set out into the wide world to learn their craft. When that night comes for Kiki, she embarks on her life journey with her chatty black cat, Jiji, landing the next morning in a sea-side village, where a bakery owner hires her to make deliveries. Rarely has the animator’s art been so brilliantly rendered as in this delightfully imaginative film – a beautiful and timeless story of a young girl finding her way in the world.


© 1986 Studio Ghibli

Castle in the Sky – A Film by Hayao Miyazaki
(124 min., Rated PG)

Wednesday, July 18, 2018 (2:00pm)
(In Japanese, subtitled in English)

Saturday, July 21, 2018 (11:00am)
(Dubbed in English)

A young girl with a mysterious crystal pendant falls out of the sky and into the arms and life of young Pazu. Together they search for a floating island in the sky, site of a long-dead civilization promising enormous wealth and power to those who can unlock its secrets. Castle in the Sky is an early masterpiece of storytelling and filmmaking whose imaginative and ornately detailed vision presaged later films like Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away.

The tanuki spend their days playing idly in the hillsides and squabbling over food – until the construction of a huge new Tokyo suburb clears the nearby forest and threatens their way of life. In an effort to defend their home, the tanuki learn to transform into humans and start playing tricks to make the workers think the construction site is haunted, ending in a spectacular night-time spirit parade, with thousands of ghosts, dragons and other magical creatures descending on the city — in an abundance of fantastical characters that would not be matched on screen by Studio Ghibli until Spirited Away.


© 1994 Hatake Jimusho – Studio Ghibli – NH

Pom Poko – A Film by Isao Takahata
(119 min., Rated PG)

Wednesday, August 15, 2018 (11:00am)
(In Japanese, subtitled in English)

Saturday, August 18, 2018 (2:00pm)
(Dubbed in English)

In this brilliant and often overlooked Studio Ghibli masterpiece from Academy Award®-nominated filmmaker Isao Takahata, the forests are filled with groups of magical tanuki, mischievous raccoon-like animals from Japanese folklore that are capable of shape-shifting from their standard raccoon form to practically any object.


© 1995 Aoi Hiiragi / Shueisha – Studio Ghibli – NH

Whisper of the Heart – A film by Yoshifumi Kondo
(111 min., Rated G)

Wednesday, August 15, 2018 (2:00pm)
(In Japanese, subtitled in English)

Saturday, August 18, 2018 (11:00am)
(Dubbed in English)

Shizuku is spending her last summer vacation before high school reading and translating foreign music into Japanese. Perusing the eclectic selection of books she has checked out from the library, her curiousity is piqued when she notices that the name Seiji appears before hers on the checkout card of each one. Through a series of curious and magical incidents, she comes to meet and establishes a connection to Seiji – who has dreams of becoming a famous violinmaker in Italy, while she has aspirations of becoming a writer. As their life goals pull them in different directions, Shizuku and Seiji are determined to remain true to their feelings for one another. A masterpiece about the awakening of creative talent, Whisper of the Heart was the first and only full-length feature by Hayao Miyazaki’s protégé Yoshifumi Kondo before his sudden death at the young age of 47. It remains one of the classics of Japanese animation.


 Buy Individual Tickets $5 each$20 Summer Pass

Yasunori Kimata Live Painting Event

Sponsored in part by JM Family Enterprises, Sushi Republic and the Renaissance Hotel


DATE  Friday, February 24, 2018

TIME  1:00pm

PRICE  FREE

LOCATION  Lobby


Come and watch art in action with Japanese artist Yasunori Kimata as he paints live at the Morikami.

Yasunori Kimata is an artist, live painter,
ceramic relief sculptor, muralist and art designer. At the age of 20, he started working as an artist under the name KAT and conducted live painting shows at a variety of events. He has held performances and exhibits in Japan and abroad, and collaborated with other artists in joint performances. Observe his skills, artistry, and mastery over the brush in this special LIVE event.

 

Strokes of Genius: Artistry and Music with Yasunori Kimata

Underwritten by the JM Foundation and Renaissance Hotel

DATE  Friday, February 23, 2018

TIME  7:00pm, museum doors reopen at 6:00pm

PRICE  $20 (members $15)

LOCATION  Morikami Theater

Advance ticket purchase required

Purchase Tickets

 


Join up-and-coming artist Yasunori Kimata for an evening of art, music and the mastery of the brush. An artist with many talents, Kimata is in his element as he paints live. See art come to life before your eyes, accompanied by the heart-pounding rhythms of taiko drumming by Fushu Daiko and the tranquil sounds of koto musician Yoshiko Carlton.  Kimata’s paintings will be auctioned off at the end of the evening with proceeds to benefit Morikami’s education programs.

Yasunori Kimata is an artist, live painter, ceramic relief sculptor, muralist and art designer. Born in 1976 in Tajimi City, Gifu Prefecture, Yasunori Kimata graduated from Nagoya Zokei Design College (now Aichi Zokei Design College.) At the age of 20, he started working as an artist under the name KAT and conducted live painting shows at a variety of events. He held performances and exhibits at a diverse array of venues within Japan and abroad, and began collaborating with other artists to hold joint performances. Among his many initiatives promoting art in his home region, Kimata hosts “ART CONNECTION” and supervises “Art Night,” as well as a live painting performance, “Wa-Art Live!” at public events in Gifu. He has been featured as an advocate for the arts in newspapers and other media.

Yoshiko Carlton started her koto training at the age of nine and continued her koto studies after moving to Florida with Mrs. Kyoko Okamato, founder of the Washington Toho Koto Society based in Washington D.C. She furthered her studies with renowned 25 stringed koto player, Brian Yamakoshi.  Since 1990 she has directed, mentored, and performed with the taiko drumming ensemble Fushu Daiko, in which she was a founding member. She established “Yoshi no Kai”, “Friends of Koto” in 2002 for the purpose of educating and introducing koto music to the West. In 2003, she was awarded a certificate of recognition by the Consulate General of Japan in Miami and in 2016 the Foreign Minister’s Commendations for her contribution in promoting Japanese culture, especially koto, to the community.

Fushu Daiko is recognized by Seiichi Tanaka, the master of San Francisco Taiko  Dojo, who brought taiko to the United States and who trained senior members of the Fushu Daiko group.

Founded in 1990, Fushu Daiko is made up of many nationalities and backgrounds, and its members have been drawn together by the taiko. Through its sound, Fushu Daiko wishes to create a sense of connection in the hearts of those who hear the taiko’s beat.

 

Saturday, February 24, 2018 – Yasunori Kimata Live Painting Event (FREE) More Information 

Performance Poetry Workshop

A Collaboration with the Palm Beach Poetry Festival

 

Date: Sunday, January 21, 2018
Cost: $35 (with paid museum admission)
Time: 11:00am – 12:30pm
Location: Oki Education Center

(Advance Registration Required)

Register Here

 

Materials to Bring:  A notebook and pen/pencil.


ABOUT THE WORKSHOP

Led by two national poetry slam champions and artists, learn about performance poetry and how to create your own work in this hands-on workshop.  Discover your own voice by exploring the ideas of self-identity through performance poetry. The workshop touches upon diversity and celebrates our personal cultural heritage, highlighting the unique individuals in our community.

Stay For…

1:30pm – 2:30pm – A public performance by Elizabeth Acevedo and G. Yamazawa will follow after the workshop, in which we invite workshop participants and museum visitors to also participate and share on stage. FREE


MEET YOUR INSTRUCTORS

Elizabeth Acevedo is the youngest child and only daughter of Dominican immigrants. She holds a BA in Performing Arts from the George Washington University and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Maryland. The Poet X (HarperCollins), her debut young adult novel, will be released in March 2018.

G. Yamazawa is a National Poetry Slam Champion, Cultural Diplomat for the Department of State, Kundiman Fellow, and Team Backpack certified. G. Yamazawa has been featured on ABC, NBC, NPR, PBS, and has toured over 200 universities in the US and abroad. With notable performances at the Sundance Film Festival and the Pentagon, Yamazawa continues to challenge the American perspective of race, culture, poetry and rap, and the phenomenon of the human condition. Yamazawa’s debut album “Shouts to Durham,” charted at #37 on the iTunes top 100 rap albums, and is currently working on his sophomore release.

Shibori Indigo Workshop


DATE  
Saturday, November 4, 2017
TIME   10:00am to 3:00pm
LOCATION   Oki Education Center
PRICE  $50
MATERIAL FEE  $20 (cash payable to the instructor)
*Advance ticket purchase required

Register Here

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP

The use of indigo dye, or aizome, has a long and cherished history in Japan. The deep blue colors for which Japanese textiles are celebrated come from the leaves of the tade ai, a plant introduced to Japan from China in the sixth century. Shibori is a Japanese technique of manual resist dyeing used to make patterns on fabrics. Learn various shibori techniques and get a chance to make a set of special dinner napkins for your home.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Formerly an Interior Designer and then Fine Art Gallery Director, Suzanne Connors has always loved art and textiles. Suzanne has maintained an active fiber art studio since 2008. Her academic background in architecture and design lays the groundwork for her practice using traditional shibori techniques. Creating a family of detail, establishing order, combining simple techniques, textures and using design repetition are foundations of her work. Suzanne enjoys sharing her passion for texture, color, and pattern through her artwork and workshops. She lives in Stuart, Florida surrounded by her family and is the founder of the Aya Fiber Studio.

Block Printing Workshop

DATES   Sunday, December 10, 2017     
TIMES:  10:30am-12:30am
LOCATION: Oki Education Center

PRICE:  $50 (Cost does not include museum admission)
Material Fee: $10 (cash payable to the instructor)

(Advance registration required)

Register Here
Please Note: This workshop does not include museum admission.

Japan has a long, rich history of woodblock printing, called mokuhanga, dating back to the 11th century. The ukiyo-e genre of block prints flourished in Japan from the 17th through 19th centuries.  The Morikami is offering a workshop with a modern twist on this ancient art form, carving and printing linoleum blocks to create unique and exciting imagery.

Instructor Brian Reedy has been teaching this method for over 20 years, and offers an approach that is easily accessible for beginners, yet challenging for seasoned artists. Printing inks can stain clothes, so dress appropriately.

Brian Reedy is a Miami-based artist who specializes in block prints. His artwork has been shown in galleries and museums nationwide, and has been featured in several international art fairs in New York City, Chicago and Miami. He is currently represented by Galerie F in Chicago, and his work can be found at Woodcut Emporium on Etsy.com

Children’s Day – Kodomo no Hi

Underwritten by the Homer and Martha Gudelsky Family Foundation

Celebrate Children’s Day with your family at the Morikami!

DATE  Saturday, May 5, 2018

TIME  10am-5pm

PRICE  FREE with paid admission unless otherwise specified.


Celebrate Children’s Day with your family at the Morikami! Enjoy a day of fun crafts to celebrate Children’s Day (Kodomo no Hi), held on May 5th each year. Make a hanging carp streamer (koinobori) or origami samurai helmet.

ACTIVITIES

  • Film Screening – Ponyo
    (Dubbed version)
  • Times: 11:00am and 2:00pm
  • Cost: $5 (with paid museum admission – children ages 3 and under free)
  • Location: Morikami Theater
Purchase 11am Tickets Purchase 2pm Tickets

Enjoy the adventures of Ponyo on the big screen! Perfect for audiences of all ages.

Ponyo centers on the friendship between five-year-old Sosuke and a magical goldfish named Ponyo, the young daughter of a sorcerer father and a sea-goddess mother. After a chance encounter, Ponyo yearns to become a human so she can be with Sosuke.

For more Studio Ghibli Films Click Here

ALL DAY FREE ACTIVITIES

  • Kabuto: Samurai Helmet –Library
    (10:00am- 4:30pm)
    FREE
    Show your courage and strength important characteristics represented by the samurai helmet, kabuto. Create your own origami kabuto and be a warrior for the day.
  • Koinobori: Carp Streamer – Classroom A
    (10:00am-3:00pm)
    FREE
    Make your own koinobori carp streamer to fly at home.
  • Make a Wish on a Koinobori Scale! – Lobby
    (10am- 5pm)
    FREE
    Write a wish on a koinobori scale to be displayed on our koinobori

OTHER ACTIVITIES

  • Get your own Sound Safari fan for cool fun in the gardens. Walk through the gardens and discover the world of Japanese sound effects. Fans are a $1 donation (All proceeds go towards Morikami education programs).
  • Get a chance to feed the koi at the Yamato-kan
    See the Morikami koi swim in a beautiful dance of color. $1 for fish food.

 

Carp windsocks, or Koinobori, fly outside the Morikami every year for Children’s Day.

© 2008 Studio Ghibli – NDHDMT

 

 

 

 

 

 

Create your own samurai helmet or carp streamer.

Enjoy feeding our koi.

 

Block Printing: Children’s Mini-Workshop

DATES   Saturday, August 18, 2018     
TIMES:  10:30am-11:30am
LOCATION: Oki Education Center

PRICE:  $25 (Cost does not include museum admission)
Material Fee: $10 (cash payable to the instructor)

For ages 4th-8th grade
(Advance registration required)

Register Here
Please Note: This workshop does not include museum admission.

Children under fourteen must be accompanied by their parent/guardian in the workshop. The parent/guardian is welcome to enroll in the workshop alongside their child.

Japan has a long, rich history of woodblock printing, called mokuhanga, dating back to the 11th century. The ukiyo-e genre of block prints flourished in Japan from the 17th through 19th centuries.  The Morikami is offering a workshop with a modern twist on this ancient art form, carving and printing linoleum blocks to create unique and exciting imagery.

Instructor Brian Reedy has been teaching this method for over 20 years, and offers an approach that is easily accessible for beginners, yet challenging for seasoned artists. Printing inks can stain clothes, so dress appropriately.

Brian Reedy is a Miami-based artist who specializes in block prints. His artwork has been shown in galleries and museums nationwide, and has been featured in several international art fairs in New York City, Chicago and Miami. He is currently represented by Galerie F in Chicago, and his work can be found at Woodcut Emporium on Etsy.com

Calligraphy: Children’s Mini-Workshop

Please Note: This workshop does not include museum admission. A $5 material fee is included in the price.

Learn how to write your name and some Japanese words with ink and brush, two traditional calligraphy writing implements in this hands-on workshop.

Register Here

DATES

Saturday, June 9, 2018 (Grade 3rd – 5th grade)
Saturday, July 7, 2018 (Grade 3rd – 5Th grade)
Saturday, August 4, 2018 (Tweens and Teens)

TIMES: 11:30am—12:30pm or 1:30pm—2:30pm
PRICE: $25
LOCATION: Oki Education Center

KOTO DEMONSTRATION

Koto is a traditional Japanese stringed instrument first introduced to Japan and China in the 7th-8th century. Learn the fascinating history of this exquisite instrument, and listen to its captivating and tranquil sounds demonstrated  by koto teacher, Mrs. Yoshiko Carlton.

Be introduced to the basics of how this instrument is played, and receive a koto music sheet of the most famous Japanese song Sakura, “Cherry Blossom.”

Saturday, February 3, 2018

TIMES: 12:00pm, 1:30pm, and 3:00pm

PRICE: $5 with paid museum admission

LOCATION: Tea House

Tickets are sold on the day of the event on a first come, first served basis

Individual reservations are not necessary but reservations are required for groups of 10 or more. Please call 561-233-1367 to reserve.

Tickets for reserved groups will be held up to 10 minutes before the start of the demonstration, after which they will be sold.

 

Introducing Miss Gunma: The Japanese Friendship Dolls of 1927

Sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Talk by Alan Scott Pate.

DATE  Saturday, March 3, 2018
TIME 
  1:00pm

LOCATION   Morikami Theater
PRICE   FREE
*No reservations. Tickets will be given out the day of the event, at a first come, first served basis.

Please note: temperatures within our theater tend to drop. We recommend arriving with a jacket or sweater.


ABOUT THE PRESENTATION

With the celebration of Hina Matsuri (Doll Festival) on March 3, Pate explores the role of Japanese dolls in traditional Japanese culture; their history, art and meaning. Special attention will be paid to the Japanese Friendship Dolls of 1927, providing the opportunity to introduce to the Morikami community their own Friendship Doll: Miss Gunma. Pate presents a lively talk with extensive visuals incorporating archival photos as well as images of the many aspects of the culture of Japanese dolls.

Alan Scott Pate is an internationally acknowledged authority on the history of Japanese dolls (ningyo). He is the author of numerous books and articles on the topic. Alan lectures around the world addressing the many facets of Japanese doll culture and is currently serving as an adjunct professor at the University of Florida. In addition to being the foremost dealer in antique Japanese dolls, he also frequently serves as a guest curator and adviser for exhibitions dealing with this deep and fascinating topic. His current focus is on the history of the Japanese Friendship Dolls of 1927, which includes the Morikami’s own “Miss Gunma.”

 

Performance Poetry by Elizabeth Acevedo and G. Yamazawa

A Collaboration with the Palm Beach Poetry Festival

Date: Sunday, January 21, 2018
Cost: FREE (with paid museum admission)
Time: 1:30pm – 2:30pm
Location: Morikami Theater

Please note: temperatures within our theater tend to drop. We recommend arriving with a jacket or sweater.


ABOUT THE EVENT

Listen to two national poetry slam champions liven up our stage with poetry.  Discover your own voice by exploring the ideas of self-identity through performance poetry. Museum visitors are also welcome to participate and share on stage. The artists are offering a Performance Poetry Workshop earlier in the day, for more details and to register CLICK HERE!


Elizabeth Acevedo is the youngest child and only daughter of Dominican immigrants. She holds a BA in Performing Arts from the George Washington University and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Maryland. The Poet X (HarperCollins), her debut young adult novel, will be released in March 2018.

G. Yamazawa is a National Poetry Slam Champion, Cultural Diplomat for the Department of State, Kundiman Fellow, and Team Backpack certified. G. Yamazawa has been featured on ABC, NBC, NPR, PBS, and has toured over 200 universities in the US and abroad. With notable performances at the Sundance Film Festival and the Pentagon, Yamazawa continues to challenge the American perspective of race, culture, poetry and rap, and the phenomenon of the human condition. Yamazawa’s debut album “Shouts to Durham,” charted at #37 on the iTunes top 100 rap albums, and is currently working on his sophomore release.

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