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Categories Archives: Exhibitions

Perseverance General Member Preview

Join us on Thursday, February 25 for this exciting members-only preview of Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World.
Morikami members & their guests only.

Schedule

6pm

(Museum Lobby, Cornell Café & Garden Terraces)

  • Museum exhibition galleries open
  • Light bites and bar service (graciously underwritten in part by the Cornell Café & Stacole Fine Wines)

7pm

(Theater)

  • Welcome remarks by Bonnie Lemay, Morikami Park Administrator
  • Exhibition preview by internationally acclaimed artist, Ryudaibori and Professor of Art at UC Santa Barbara, artist and filmmaker, Kip Fulbeck
  • Remarks by Greg Kimura, CEO of the Japanese American National Museum, Los Angeles, organizer of the Perseverance exhibition
  • Tebori demonstration (traditional Japanese tattooing method) by tattoo artist, Horitomo

8:15pm

(Exhibition Galleries)

  • Meet & Greet with artists and speakers: Ryudaibori, Horoitomo, Chris Nuñez, Kip Fulbeck and Greg Kimura

9pm

  • Galleries Close
Please RSVP by Thursday, February 18, 2016.
Call 561.233.1345 or email morikamimembers@pbcgov.org.
Complimentary for members, $10 for guests.

Perseverance VIP Exhibition Preview

Join us on Tuesday, February 23 for this exciting VIP preview of Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World.
For all Wisdom Ring, Samurai, and Taiko members, invited guests of the exhibitor and the Museum.

Schedule

6pm

(Museum Lobby, Cornell Café & Garden Terraces)

  • Museum exhibition galleries open
  • Bar service including passed champagne, a premium sake selection, Japanese beer and wine (graciously underwritten in part by Stacole Fine Wines)
  • Passed hors d’ouevres & food stations open (graciously underwritten in part by the Cornell Café)

7pm

(Theater)

  • Welcome remarks by Bonnie Lemay, Morikami Park Administrator
  • Exhibition preview by internationally acclaimed artist, Ryudaibori and Professor of Art at UC Santa Barbara, artist and filmmaker, Kip Fulbeck
  • Remarks by Greg Kimura, CEO of the Japanese American National Museum, Los Angeles, organizer of the Perseverance exhibition
  • Tebori demonstration (traditional Japanese tattooing method) by tattoo artist, Horitomo

8:15pm

(Exhibition Galleries)

  • Meet & Greet with artists and speakers: Ryudaibori, Horoitomo, Chris Nuñez, Kip Fulbeck and Greg Kimura

9pm

  • Galleries Close
Please RSVP by Tuesday, February 16, 2016.
Call 561.233.1316 or email morikamimembers@pbcgov.org.

Exhibit Opening Reception (Members Only)

Event Details

  • This event is open to all Morikami members
  • A brief presentation on the exhibition will be held in the theater.
  • Dress code is business attire
  • $10 for guests not covered by your membership


Jimmy Tsutomu Mirikitani

October 9, 2015 – January 31, 2016 (Member Preview October 8)

Jimmy Tsutomu Mirikitani (1920 – 2012) was a fiercely independent Japanese American artist who lost his family and friends to the United States internment camps during World War II and Hiroshima’s atomic bombing. He survived the trauma of those two significant events and endured homelessness on the streets of New York City by creating art. This exhibition presents a selection of drawings that Mirikitani made before his death at the age of ninety-two. His work is a poignant exploration of the lasting impacts of war and discrimination, and the healing power of creativity.

Organized by The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience, Seattle, Washington, and guest-curated by Roger Shimomura.  Funded in part by the Henry and Tomoye Takahashi Charitable Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Cat with Okinawan White Fish

Wendy Maruyama: Executive Order 9066

October 9, 2015 – January 31, 2016 (Member Preview October 8)

In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the internment of tens of thousands of American citizens and resident aliens of Japanese ancestry. Wendy Maruyama, a third generation Japanese American and highly regarded artist and furniture maker based in San Diego, has created a compelling body of work examining this period in American history.

The exhibition includes three integrated parts: Executive Order 9066, the Tag Project, and a selection of historical artifacts. Executive Order 9066 involves a series of wall-mounted cabinets and sculptures referencing themes common in the internment camps. Maruyama’s pieces integrate photo transfers based on the documentary photographs of Dorothea Lange and Toyo Miyatake in conjunction with materials such as barbed wire, tarpaper and domestic objects. The Tag Project consists of groupings of 120,000 recreated, paper identification tags suspended from the ceiling. The suspended tags evoke a powerful sense of the humiliation endured by the internees and the sheer numbers of those displaced. Maruyama’s inclusion of actual objects owned or made by the internees brings an intensely personal awareness to the impact of Executive Order 9066. Included objects range from actual suitcases used by families during their relocation to an array of items made by internees from materials made available to them in the camps.

Organized by The Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston, Massachusetts.  Funded in part by the Windgate Charitable Foundation, the Henry and Tomoye Takahashi Charitable Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

1---Tag-Project

New Exhibitions Open

View our newest exhibitions Japan’s Robot Kingdom & The Morikami Menagerie: Creatures in Japanese Art

Japan’s Robot Kingdom

June 16, 2015 – September 13, 2015

This exhibition explores Japan’s vast robot kingdom through a collection of vintage toys, figurines, and comics. For the past 50 years, the subject of robots has been an integral component of Japan’s pop culture industry as represented by a variety of media including toys, manga (Japanese comics), and anime (Japanese animation). Most take the form of androids, robots that mimic human form and interaction, mecha, massive robots piloted by heroes or villains engaged in constant galactic battles, and, cyborgs, biological organisms infused with mechanical parts.

Healthcare is a driving force in the robotic industry. In the medical field robotic parts have been incorporated in the form of prostheses, pacemakers and cochlear implants.  Japanese companies are also devoting resources to the development of products designed to benefit the health and well-being of the country’s elderly population. Soft, beguiling robots like PARO, a furry baby harp seal, have the ability to soothe patients by engaging in realistic emotional interactions that can lead to comfort and bonding. Japan’s Robot Kingdom playfully demonstrates how the imaginative interplay between fantasy and science has influenced astounding real-world innovations.

Funding made possible by the Henry and Tomoye Takahashi Charitable Foundation and sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts & Culture.  Our appreciation goes to lenders Rick and Jeanne Newman of hightechscience.org, TATE’S Comics + Toys + More, Bennie Albert of Uberscosplay, and the Consulate General of Japan in Miami.

 


The Morikami Menagerie: Creatures in Japanese Art

June 16, 2015 – September 13, 2015

Animals have long been a popular subject of Japanese material culture and folklore. For example, inherent in Shintō, Japan’s indigenous belief system, is the notion that divine spirits can manifest themselves as animals in addition to other animate and inanimate forms. Also, in Japanese lore, animals, both real and imagined have often been perceived in anthropomorphic terms. Because they are seen to possess certain desirable characteristics, tigers, dragons and carp have long stood as icons of virtuous behavior, while mischievous shape-shifters, such as foxes and badgers, symbolize human foibles. Indeed, in Japanese culture the ambiguity found in the complex nature of humans is often imposed on the world of creatures. While the Japanese macaque, or snow monkey, is seen as a pest that steals food, it is also venerated as a messenger of certain Shintō gods.

Early Japanese art and literature were heavily influenced by the aesthetic traditions of China and Korea. With the introduction of Buddhism to Japan in the 6th century, animal iconography and attributes took on more varied interpretations. Buddhist parables rich with exotic animals and supernatural hybrids came to be favorite subjects in Japanese art and architecture following Chinese models. The shishi, or mythological lion-dog, became a guardian figure at Shintō shrines just as it had been in palaces at China.

During the Edo period (1600 – 1868), Japan’s elite commissioned artists to create works that depicted animal subjects.  Birds of prey were common. Japan’s warrior class saw itself reflected in the ability of such birds to attack swiftly and ruthlessly. Samurai kept falcons as hunting birds and as symbols of military might.  They also collected paintings of hawks to decorate their impressive homes. Tigers and horses were also favorite subjects associated with warrior prowess. As seen in the present exhibition, such paintings, mounted as folding screens or as scrolls, were often created on an expansive scale.

The Japanese people have cultivated a deep consciousness and love of nature and a strong kinship to the animals around them. Even in the fast-paced, technology-driven Japan of today, the bond between human and animal continues to be explored in Japanese comics (manga) and animation (anime). The supernatural creatures of folk tradition and Shintō and Buddhist lore today take the form of nuclear-spawned mutant giant reptiles, such as Godzilla (Gojira), clever and incorrigible robots like the earless blue cat Doraemon, and the shape-shifting mechanical alien beings known as Transformers.

Funding made possible by the Henry and Tomoye Takahashi Charitable Foundation and sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts & Culture.

 

World Peace Through Ikebana

2016 Sogetsu Ikebana Exhibition & Demonstration


SCHEDULE:

Saturday & Sunday, February 6 & February 7, 2016

10:00am–5:00pm: Explore a vivid display of Ikebana, Japanese flower design in the Morikami lobby.
(FREE with paid museum admission)

Monday, February 8, 2016

10:30am: Doors Open

10:30am–3:30pm: Ikebana exhibition in lobby
(FREE with paid ticket to demonstration)

11am–1:30pm: Buffet lunch served at the Cornell Café
($20 in advance | $25 at the door, if available)

1:30–3:00pm: Ikebana Demonstration by Soei Chieko Mihori
($30 in advance | $35 at the door, if available)

TO PURCHASE TICKETS:

Space for lunch and demonstration are limited. For more information contact Chieko Mihori at 561-278-3614 or e-mail chieko.mihori@gmail.com

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Sogetsu-show-mihori-sensei-WEB

Exhibit Opening Reception (Members Only)

Event Details

  • This event is open to all Morikami members
  • A brief presentation on the exhibition will be held in the theater.
  • Dress code is business attire
  • $5 for guests not covered by your membership

Poetry in Clay: The Art of Ōtagaki Rengetsu

February 12, 2015 – May 24, 2015

Ōtagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) was a Japanese Buddhist nun and one of the most renowned female artists of her time. She celebrated life, love and loss through the creation of paintings and rustic pottery inscribed with her poignant, often playful, verse. Her artistic legacy numbers over 50,000 works, including those produced through unique collaborative partnerships with other noted artists of the time. The Morikami Museum is honored to exhibit a small, yet exquisite selection of her work from the Johnstone-Fong Collection.

Japanese Design for the Senses: Beauty, Form and Function

This exhibition has been EXTENDED through May 24 due to popular demand. We invite you to revisit this fascinating exhibition, featuring several newly selected pieces from the museum’s collections.

RSVP

The deadline for RSVP’s to this exhibit opening reception was February 6, 2015. We are no longer accepting RSVP’s as we are at capacity.

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